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  1. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
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    10 Aug '19 08:19

    Removed by poster

  2. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
    Fleet Street
    Joined
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    06 Sep '19 18:432 edits

    Removed by poster

  3. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
    Fleet Street
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    07 Sep '19 08:22
    Just a quick plug for my book, SEVERUS: The Black Caesar... 🙂

    If you have Amazon Prime the Kindle eBook is free to you!
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WLNS4W1/

    It's also available in paperback.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1086355393/

    If you enjoy it please give it 5 stars and a quick one-line review to help spread the word!
  4. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
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    10 Sep '19 12:471 edit
    Here's an excerpt from a little chess analogy I couldn't resist..

    Severus softly talks as he watches Geta and Lucius play a game of chess.
    “It is said that war is little more than a glorified children’s game. Lines are drawn. Sides are chosen. Blood is shed. But what is not said, what is conveniently omitted, is the indelible marks they leave so painfully etched upon the human soul. Africans, Romans, Greeks. Are we not all of one blood? Are we not all of one race? So, to what end do we endeavour? For what purpose do we seek to assert dominance over our own kind? No other animal I have seen conspires to such a degree. Preferring to fight one’s common enemy rather than each other. Perhaps we are destined to always remain as children, repeating our mistakes and playing our fatal games.”
    “Checkmate,” Geta says.
    Geta extends his hand to shake but Lucius just looks at him. A slight crack of smile appears on Lucius’s face as he slaps his king across the room and exits.
  5. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
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    17 Sep '19 10:57
    @Benjamin-Barker

    Just to clear that up: The Romans played Chess ??
    And here I sit and thought it was brought to Europe by Crusader learning it from Arabs who in turn have learned it from the persians (Shah is persian) and they in turn from India...
  6. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
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    17 Sep '19 12:21
    @Ponderable

    Read the book - Severus wasn't a Roman. 😉
  7. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
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    17 Sep '19 12:23
    @Benjamin-Barker

    I might do so 😉
  8. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
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    17 Sep '19 12:31
    @Ponderable

    Being such a chess fan I used a bit of dramatic license - Seveurs had a keen military mind that would have appreciated chess and he most certainly would have played "Latrones" (Ludus Latrunculorum) which is similar to "Go" (Fangqi).
  9. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
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    08 Oct '19 06:35
    I was encouraged and excited to see that notable historian Patrick Vernon included the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus on his list of 100 Great Black Britons and that he ended up ranking as highly as 25 in the final list. 

    Severus died in York in 211 BC and was arguably the first black man to set foot on British soil, but he came not as a slave, but as Emperor.  Behind this still little-known fact there is the incredible tale of someone who grew from rebellious youth to the most powerful man in the ancient world.

    Septimius Severus, the Black Caesar, came from humble beginnings in occupied North Africa, born in the Mediterranean city of Lepcis Magna. He would end his days fighting in Northern Scotland, having expanded the Roman Empire further than any of his illustrious predecessors, from Julius Caesar to his mentor, Marcus Aurelius.

    As a boy, Severus hated the Romans. He was involved with local freedom fighters, taking part in daring raids of sabotage against the Empire. But frustrated by this small-time rebellion and its petty violence, the keen-witted Severus embarked on a journey to Rome, taking him to the heart of the power that he despised.

    Once there, however, the picture changes. Little by little, his exposure to Rome begins to change him and soon he finds himself in an ironic position: sent as a soldier from Rome to fight his fellow Africans, as they cross the Mediterranean and into Spain. His accidental military career gains him a reputation, and powerful friends.

    When the much-loved Emperor Marcus Aurelius dies and his depraved son Commodus becomes the new ruler, Rome becomes an increasingly dangerous place. After Commodus is assassinated, the veteran Roman general Pertinax is hailed as Emperor. However, Pertinax manages to hold on to his throne and his head for a mere sixty-eight days, and his murder plunges Rome into bloody civil war.

    Severus now commands one of the largest Roman legions in the Empire and finds himself drawn into a conflict from which he will emerge, ultimately, as Emperor.

    The peace that Severus’s victory brings is short-lived. Rome’s dominions never stay subdued for long. Treachery both from his advisers, and from within his own family, keep the new Emperor watching his back. His unfaithful wife Julia is plotting his death, and his son is emerging as a vicious and disturbed young Emperor-in-waiting.

    SEVERUS: The Black Caesar which is available on Amazon in Kindle and paperback format charts his incredible life in full and is being developed into a TV drama series for HBO/SKY Atlantic starring the actor and music artist, Marlowe Simms (aka Septimius the Great). 

    http://amzn.eu/6FssnLX
  10. Joined
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    08 Oct '19 12:03
    @benjamin-barker said
    I was encouraged and excited to see that notable historian Patrick Vernon included the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus on his list of 100 Great Black Britons and that he ended up ranking as highly as 25 in the final list. 

    Severus died in York in 211 BC and was arguably the first black man to set foot on British soil, but he came not as a slave, but as Emperor.  B ...[text shortened]... ing the actor and music artist, Marlowe Simms (aka Septimius the Great). 

    http://amzn.eu/6FssnLX
    You, kind Sir, are a true historian.
    I sincerely look forward to learning more.
    It's refreshing to have an authentic scholar in our midst.
  11. Joined
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    08 Oct '19 12:08
    @benjamin-barker said
    I was encouraged and excited to see that notable historian Patrick Vernon included the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus on his list of 100 Great Black Britons and that he ended up ranking as highly as 25 in the final list. 

    Severus died in York in 211 BC and was arguably the first black man to set foot on British soil, but he came not as a slave, but as Emperor.  B ...[text shortened]... ing the actor and music artist, Marlowe Simms (aka Septimius the Great). 

    http://amzn.eu/6FssnLX
    "As a boy, Severus hated the Romans. He was involved with local freedom fighters, taking part in daring raids of sabotage against the Empire. But frustrated by this small-time rebellion and its petty violence, the keen-witted Severus embarked on a journey to Rome, taking him to the heart of the power that he despised.

    Once there, however, the picture changes. Little by little, his exposure to Rome begins to change him and soon he finds himself in an ironic position: sent as a soldier from Rome to fight his fellow Africans, as they cross the Mediterranean and into Spain. His accidental military career gains him a reputation, and powerful friends."

    - Benjamin Barker

    I can't help but comment on the familiarity of this circumstance. It slightly coincides with that of Napoleon Bonaparte some 1600 years later. Very interesting indeed.
  12. Standard membersonship
    the corrected one.
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    09 Oct '19 07:341 edit
    @Benjamin-Barker

    Being such a chess fan I used a bit of dramatic license - Seveurs had a keen military mind that would have appreciated chess and he most certainly would have played "Latrones" (Ludus Latrunculorum) which is similar to "Go" (Fangqi).


    For what it is worth, someone just told me that their chess game dramatically improved when he learned to play it the way you play "Go".

    I know nothing about the game "Go". But he said he started winning more when he learned the value of concentrating on controlling areas of the board.
  13. SubscriberBenjamin Barker
    Demon Barber
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    14 Oct '19 06:58
    @ponderable said
    @Benjamin-Barker

    I might do so 😉
    I've had one paperback sale in Germany - was that you?
  14. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
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    14 Oct '19 11:10
    @benjamin-barker said
    I've had one paperback sale in Germany - was that you?
    Most likely, the book arrived and is on place two in the to be read stack 😉
    (finishing the Statrefiled book and then reading the library Yalom )
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