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  1. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    35797
    26 Feb '21 14:58

    Answers to last weeks quiz and Spot the Difference Competition.

    Part two on how I use Chessbase to get games for the blog.

    The inspiration was from an OTB game Gelfand - Lautier, Belgrade 1997
    which featured a Bishop outplaying a Rook. Well it should have been but
    Lautier missed it. Instead I have found a few RHP Bishop v Rook checkmates.

    Gelfand - Lautier, Belgrade 1997 (Black to play)


    After that a couple of Knight v Red Hot Pawn Rooks checkmates.
    (the Knight gets jealous if I show too many Bishop checkmates)

    Blog Post 477
  2. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    35797
    23 Feb '21 09:18
    HI drcyclops,

    The chessbase news site or the DataBase program.

    The Database program is ideal for a writer/blogger, it's find positions,
    manoeuvres, material balances search routines are invaluable.
  3. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    20 Feb '21 23:41
    I'll not go out of my way to get the book. I have quite a few on Fischer already.
    (I am currently going through the Soltis book on Carlsen - I'll blog my review end of March.)

    Karpov v Fischer
    (leaving aside Fischer mental illness that made him give up and what might have
    happened with him walking. Stay with chess and what we know.)

    The feeling amongst all the other 1000's (no exaggeration) of posts I've
    seen on the Karpov - Fischer result is a slight tip to Fischer wins in 1975 and Karpov 1978.

    The general comments in favour of Fischer are:
    The off the board antics of Fischer and his OTB stamina would have got to Karpov.
    Karpov's suspect stamina was highlighted by him losing three games out of four
    in the tail end of the 1978 match along with all the chaos of the 1978 match.
    (and of course the Moscow Marathon).

    Come 1978 he would have had the 1975 experience and by then he was the great
    player he became. (we will never know if Fischer could have gotten stronger
    although not playing he was looking at games - even finding missed wins v
    Karpov in 1974 see: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1067850 )

    My one reservation is our man Geller, he would have been Karpov's second and
    Karpov would have listened to him (he was Spassky's second in '72 and Boris
    refused to look at Bobby playing anything but 1.e4.) see Blog Post 251
    For a 1972 pre-match cover of 'Chess Life and Review' anticipating just this.

    Geller (and Tal) would have cooked up a few surprises.
    But Bobby too would have had a few as well. (Also Kavalek who helped him out
    in the latter half of the 1972 match. He was opening expert.)

    I've also debated elsewhere that if we are ignore Fischer's issues than we
    must ignore the Karpov stamina matter. So two fit players. Still Fischer 1975
    he was a great chess player. (we must never forget that.) and Karpov himself
    says every chess player owes him a great deal for raising the level of the
    conditions, the media interest and of course the money.

    (In 1969 the Petrosian - Spassky purse was $3,000 - in 1972 it was $138,000
    which was the main reason Spassky did not walk away after the 2nd game default.
    If he walked he would have got his appearance fee, nothing more.)

    Karpov 1978, in 1975 not quite there yet, but close, very close.
    But alas... (alongside no Morphy v Staunton or Alekhine -Capablanca return match)

    Not a Fischer fanboy, in fact I like Karpov more. Met him once, spent a couple
    of hours with him, just him and me at the Edinburgh Chess Club. Great day.
  4. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    35797
    16 Feb '21 13:09
    @Phil-A-Dork played a day after a the Smothered Mate blog.
    (this is wonderful - somebody is paying attention. 😀 )
  5. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    15 Feb '21 18:07
    Hi Phil,

    Chessbase is a program for Databases, you have to enter a Data Base full of games
    into it and it does all kind of wonderful things. I get a load of games from Russ
    (the site owner) every now and then - at the moment this is close to 5 million games.

    They come in PGN format, massive files of often 300,000 games in this format.
    (a game I just took off the 'View Games' link)

    [Event "Challenge"]
    [Site "https://www.redhotpawn.com"]
    [Date "2021.01.29"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "emilyorgovanyi"]
    [Black "Hubble"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [WhiteElo "1000"]
    [BlackElo "1009"]
    [EndDate "2021.02.15"]
    [WhiteRating "1000"]
    [BlackRating "1009"]
    [GameId "14194432"]

    1. d3 e5 2. Be3 Nc6 3. Nh3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Bg5 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 O-O 7. a4 Qe7 8.
    Rb1 Qc5 9. Be3 Qxc3+ 10. Bd2 Qa3 11. Ra1 Qc5 12. a5 d6 13. g3 Bxh3 14. Bxh3 e4
    15. f3 exf3 16. exf3 Rae8+ 17. Qe2 Rxe2+ 18. Kxe2 Re8+ 19. Kd1 Qd4 20. Ra3 a6
    21. f4 b5 22. Rb3 Qa1+ 23. Bc1 Nd4 24. Rb4 Ne2 25. Re1 Qxc1# 0-1

    I then run a program to change the game ID ([GameId "14194432"]) with the site info
    Because ChessBAse does not show the Game ID and I like to keep it because it
    is easier to write down (or remember ) an 8 digit number than it is to recall the
    names of both players because some of them are spelt crazy others are
    gobbledygook.

    Regarding how long it takes. Not too long. I have about 6 or 7 'fillers' the
    hard is bit is thinking up the main bit - what is it about. The main theme.
    Once I have an idea or in this case, have been fed an idea. I have it done in a day. Good fun. I already have an idea for the next one, have fillers (short games/jokes)

    Once the blog gets close to 10,000 hits I post the next one. (provided I have an idea,
    Sometimes I'm stuck but something usually pops up and I can get started.
  6. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    35797
    15 Feb '21 13:221 edit
    I tricked myself. 😀
  7. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    15 Feb '21 13:19
    Hi Phil-A-Dork it is 5 moves. 6 was a typo - corrected.
  8. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    15 Feb '21 12:472 edits

    A brief explanation (with pictures!) how I find and select RHP games for the blog.
    I used the Philidor’s Legacy examples (wins and losses) from Red Hot Pawn games.

    Then an RHP player as Black finds an amusing way to lose their Queen in 7 moves.

    Also a study by A. Wotawa in 1935 White to play mates in 5 moves.


    I’ll give you a wee clue.



    Blog Post 476


    Edit. Originally had White to play and mate in 6 moves. It is 5 moves.
  9. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    35797
    11 Feb '21 16:061 edit
    Sorry Venda but I could not disagree more about not using books.

    First of all it is a time proven method of studying. Chess before computers
    produced some of the greatest players the game has known.

    Yes it can be a wee bit laborious going back to the last diagram
    to re-set position but if the writer has added a varaition then they
    must think it is important. Some of them best ideas I have found
    OTB have come from a note.

    I have in my time (70 in June) played 1,000's of combinations and
    not one have I ever made up on my own. The idea/pattern has come
    from something I looked at the in the past from books.

    The knack I use (I was put onto this method by a strong player)
    was to ignore the notes and play over the main moves first.
    Then do the game again, this way patterns and lessons sink in
    and in a few cases you do not need to play out a note because you
    aware of what happened and you have become so familar with the
    game re-setting it is easier.

    There is no short cut, and anyway I really enjoy playing over a game
    from a book. I'll go over it again and again. When I was mustard hot
    on chess spending an hour on one game was not uncommon.

    There is no quick fix.
    The trouble with DVD's and online puzzles is it not increasing or aiding
    your 3d vision. You must get the eyes roaming all over the board and staring
    at postage stamp sized pictures just does not do it for the average player.

    The other problem is the swamping speeed of skipping through a game
    online. People do six or seven games in 10 minutes. What are you learning?
    Maybe the gifted few, the kids in the top 20 today can do it but they are the exceptions.

    I'm reading the Soltis book on Carlsen - a game a day. He studied with
    a book and board till he was about 15. Up till then, according to his trainer,
    he was computer illiterate. (good book, enjoying it. I look forward to going over
    a game, just the same way one looks forward to seeing a film.)

    Hi Couch Curls,

    Looks like you are NOT one of the exceptions. That means you are like the
    rest of us, the 99.999%. Do not fret. Happy days ahead.

    All I can do is rec a book I know helped me. The good news is I know for sure
    it helped thousands of others and a good book and board makes studying
    not work, but good relaxing fun and something to look forward too.

    LogicalChess by Chernev (the algebraic version.)
    Take your time - no more than two a day. Go through each one three times
    till you have the ideas behind the moves memorised. Once you have the ideas
    and patterns stored you will find, without even trying, you could be able to
    produce the whole game from memory even though that was not your intention.

    It won't happen overnight but you get will better and increase your
    enjoyment of the game. Speaking of which: Game 14210015

    ghiocel - You RHP 2012. White has just played 16.f4.


    When one player shoves their f-pawn from a 0-0 position it is always a critical moment
    in any game. It is either good or bad. You played 16...Neg4 which is OK but you could
    have won a pawn by force. There was no need to have lost this game.

  10. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    11 Feb '21 14:55
    Black to play:


    Not liking 15...Rfc8. I'd go for 15...Ne4 (which is surely the idea behind 14...b4.)

    Then After White moves the Queen f7-f5 - which is why I like to keep the Rook on f8.
    Later If White does not 0-0 and challenges the e4 Knight with Ng3 do not
    take it as it opens the h-file. how about Qa5 which may squeeze out b3
    and then Rac8 hitting a genuine backward pawn on an open file.
  11. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    05 Feb '21 17:582 edits

    I was asked to look up some smothered mates missed or played.
    I found a game I blogged five years ago. Even if you may have
    seen it before, it's well worth another viewing. It's just incredible.

    andy m - DeepThought RHP 2006

    This was a Sicilian Defence. After this game was published the
    people of Sicily put the final position of this game on their flag.

  12. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    35797
    05 Feb '21 11:29
    Hi Gratis-Pawn,

    That is an interesting one. Already I can recall a missed smothered mate
    the player took a perpetual instead. I used it on a blog ages ago.
    I'll see what else I can find.
  13. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    03 Feb '21 13:39
    Hi Gratis-Pawn

    Good question and an idea for the next blog - how do I do it.
    It fairly easy with the right software, just have to know how to tweak it.

    Give me a test - what tactic/trick would you like to see (anyone?)
  14. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    03 Feb '21 02:271 edit

    'The Queens Gambit’ and Najdorf.

    I could not think of where I had seen Beth Harmon before. Now I know.

    Also Najdorf wondering if his opponent is either a genius or an idiot.
    A handful of RHP games using the trick/trap Najdorf tried v Portisch.

    Blog Post 475
  15. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    30 Jan '21 13:19
    They need to get the candidates finished. FIDE says mid - Spring.
    A reminder how it stands after seven rounds.

    Maxime Vachier-Lagrave 4.½
    Ian Nepomniachtchi 4.½
    Wang Hao 3.½
    Anish Giri 3.½
    Alexander Grischuk 3.½
    Fabiano Caruana 3.½
    Ding Liren 2.½
    Kirill Alekseenko 2.½
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