1. Standard memberGambrel
    Supratherion
    Garden City Colorado
    Joined
    16 Aug '15
    Moves
    1245
    19 Aug '21 01:031 edit
    Evgeny Ellinovich Sveshnikov
    As a chess Theorist I'm saddened at his passing, very thankful for his contributions.
  2. Standard membermchill
    Cryptic
    Behind the scenes
    Joined
    27 Jun '16
    Moves
    2473
    19 Aug '21 14:24
    @gambrel said
    Evgeny Ellinovich Sveshnikov
    As a chess Theorist I'm saddened at his passing, very thankful for his contributions.
    Interesting idea he had that scoresheets should be treated as intellectual property, and not be freely given away to chess publications to be used for profit without some royalty payments to the players that worked to generate them. Clearly a pretty smart guy.
  3. Joined
    18 Jan '07
    Moves
    9683
    22 Aug '21 13:57
    @mchill said
    Interesting idea he had that scoresheets should be treated as intellectual property, and not be freely given away to chess publications to be used for profit without some royalty payments to the players that worked to generate them. Clearly a pretty smart guy.
    And yet, where would us patzers be without those scores?

    I'm all for players being paid for their work, but not at the price of keeping the game in the dark for the rest of us. Pay them - but the moves must be public.
  4. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    38805
    22 Aug '21 15:05
    Not that anything can be done about it now, but It is a an justice.

    Sometimes all a player has to show for playing a great instructive game is one point
    on the scoreboard. Meanwhile hacks (me included) can use the game in an article or
    book and get paid for it without legally having to give the player(s) a penny.

    And what about the players names that are attached to these games. They are
    being used to sell a book/article. Legally you should have permission and be
    prepared to pay for use of their name.

    It is also ludicrous (to me anyway) that the moves are not copyright but the notes
    within the game are.

    And how about 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 etc - not copyright.

    But if I write; 'The first move was pawn to e4, Black replied, pawn to e5, White played the Knight on g1 to the square f3....' that protected by copyright.
  5. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Quarantined World
    Joined
    27 Oct '04
    Moves
    87415
    26 Aug '21 03:11
    @greenpawn34 said
    Not that anything can be done about it now, but It is a an justice.

    Sometimes all a player has to show for playing a great instructive game is one point
    on the scoreboard. Meanwhile hacks (me included) can use the game in an article or
    book and get paid for it without legally having to give the player(s) a penny.

    And what about the players names that are atta ...[text shortened]... plied, pawn to e5, White played the Knight on g1 to the square f3....' that protected by copyright.
    Actually, I don't agree. The game happens in public and the players are eligible for prizes, may be sponsored or in receipt of appearance fees. Once the game's been played then to be paid a second time for it the player really ought to annotate the game and the annotations are covered by copyright law.

    Also it's unmanageable, if the game is protected by copyright then whatever novelty they produce would be as well, so any player who plays that novelty in future games would have to give some of their earnings to the originator.
  6. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    38805
    27 Aug '21 10:52
    Hi DeepThought

    Agree it would be unmanageable to copyright games but you are using the players
    name to sell a book. You and me could cobble together Carlsen's best games and
    he would not be entitled to a penny and we do not need his permission, nor do
    we need permission to use his picture on the cover (but we do and may have to pay
    the person who happened to spend 5 seconds taking the picture.)

    If we put in the same games but not his name and picture on the cover it would
    be a non-starter. Try attaching a famous person's name to sell something apart
    from a book and you could find yourself facing a lawsuit.

    It just seems wrong. IMO the player(s) are not being rewarded in full for their
    creativity and the enjoyment it gives to others which often took hours to create.

    I've seen this discussed on another forum and read that the games are 'probably'
    the property of the organisers of the tournament and none have ever sought
    copyright though Staunton raised the possibility in 1851 but gave up after meeting
    opposition and again realising it was impossible.
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