The Ghosts of Old Chess Masters.

The Ghosts of Old Chess Masters.

The Planet Greenpawn

The Ghosts of Old Chess Masters.


It was Thomas Alva Edison who wiped out more ghosts, ghouls and goblins
than Van Helsing when he invented the electric light bulb in the year 1879

Before we all saw the light we had to make do with wax candles and these things
were not to good at lighting up rooms or corridors. They shimmered with the any
soft breeze causing moving shadows on the walls and our imaginations did the rest.

Title here

But the mediums began to thrive and these table knockers were putting people in
touch with relatives who had passed over to the spirit world or contacting everyone
from Sitting Bull to Julius Caesar, from Isaac Newton to...Paul Charles Morphy!

And so it came to pass that inside the August 1924 Austrian Chess Magazine the
‘Neue Wiener Schachzeitung', Max Weiss (1857-1927) wrote an article about
a Dr. Streber who presented him with an unknown Morphy game played in 1908.

Title here

A picture of me and one of Morphy that I....er...painted.

Title here

Now every Louisiana schoolboy knows Morphy died (sorry passed over) in 1884
so this had to be wrong. However Dr. Streber attached, along with the game, a form
signed by three witness’s saying that Dr. Streber had played Morphy’s ghostly spirit!

(why Morphy would want to play the good doctor when he can have a game with
Steinitz, Anderssen, or even Pillsbury in the Afterlife Chess Club is suspicious.
Maybe the only other player to manifest himself that night was Howard Staunton.)

"From World Cup Chess by Kavalek"

The game was published, people suspected it was a hoax (no kidding!)
and it was discovered that the game Morphy v Dr. Streber was infact:

Josef Krejcik - Konrad Krobot, a casual game played at the Cafe Victoria, Vienna 1908.

Which is indeed a great pity because if it was so easy to summon up the spirit
of a past master then chess books could come with an Ouija Board and the spirit
contact password (a bit like logging onto a chess site but without all the insults
one gets from the forums) we could then get the past master to explains things to us.

Title here

Here is the game in question. (It was claimed Morphy was White.)


red pawns

This position (White to play) usually arises after the following six moves.
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Bc5 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Bxd4 6. Qxd4 Qf6


It has appeared 67 times on Red Hot Pawn and sadly 13 players of the White
pieces have missed that Black has the Queen winning threat Nf6+ and Qxd4.

The chief culprit is the attractive looking 7.Nd5.


Which looks like it forces 7...Qd6 when 8.f4 wins a truck load of material.
Black springs the trap with 7...Nf3+ and Qxd4 and ‘trap’ is the correct term.
A genuine chess trap must have a flaw which if spotted can reverse the roles.

The best way of side-stepping the trap is 7.Nb5 which holds the White Queen and hits c7.


And from here Black has been getting checkmated in a few moves.

Ali Rebai - sallen RHP 2017 (+ a number of other games)


VadimGorovoy - dajackal RHP.2007


green pawns

This weeks puzzle is fairly easy. White to play....


....and mate in 70 moves. Gustavus Charles Reichhelm, 1870(?)

Don’t fret, it’s easy to see what to do, it’s just the doing it that is the hard bit.
I spotted the idea fairly quickly but used the solution given instead of solving it.

From the above diagram we have to get to here.




green pawns


The thread accompanying this blog is Thread 183980

Posted to The Planet Greenpawn

Show Comments (9)
Comments (9)

  • Posted 177 days 13 hours and 35 minutes ago
    Subscribergreenpawn34
    White resigned - corrected. I was close. 50-50 right.
  • Posted 178 days 7 hours and 31 minutes ago
    SubscriberMalky58
    In thw game VadimGorovoy - dajackal RHP.2007 thnk it should read White resigned
  • Posted 178 days 13 hours and 59 minutes ago
    Subscribergreenpawn34
    Hi Moonbus, I'm beginning to think that Morphy did not play this game.
  • Posted 178 days 18 hours and 49 minutes ago
    Subscribermoonbus
    18. Rd6 is clever, but White can win without it. 18. gxh5 gxh5 19. Bxg7+ Kxg7 20. Nf7+ Kf6 21. Qh4+ Kf5 22. Qg5+ Ke4 23. Rge1+ Kf3 24. Qg3#
  • Posted 179 days 3 hours ago
    Subscribergreenpawn34
    Hi Moonbus: It does say: "The whole issue had almost been forgotten, when Dr. Streber died. He left a sealed letter for Weiss. He couldn't stand all the criticism Weiss had had to endure and now fully revealed the truth:" https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1421407
  • Posted 179 days 4 hours and 2 minutes ago
    Subscribermoonbus
    . . . am to a certain fictitious "Streber", to a wannabe Morphy.
  • Posted 179 days 4 hours and 3 minutes ago
    Subscribermoonbus
    I might just mention that to any German speaker, "Dr. Streber" is clearly a facetious pseudonym. A "Streber" is a student who works a bit too hard, does a bit too much homework, shows up in class before the teacher/professor arrives, and generally makes a nuisance of himself to the rest of the students by making them look dumber than himself. Sheldon Cooper, for example, is a "Streber." If Josef Emil Krejcik was indeed known for humorous books, then he knew just what he was doing when he 'attributed' the ga
  • Posted 179 days 6 hours and 46 minutes ago
    Subscribergreenpawn34
    Thanks mynameisklint, always good to have more background on any player. https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=23778
  • Posted 179 days 7 hours and 3 minutes ago
    Standard membermynameisklint
    "Josef Emil Krejcik was born in Vienna. He was a player, journalist and chess author. He won many brilliancy prizes without winning tournaments but is probably best known for his humorous books."
    (from chessgames.com)
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